2018-19 Katz Center Fellowship Program: "Jewish Life in Modern Islamic Contexts"

The fellowship program invites roughly twenty scholars each year to conduct research on a specific theme within the various fields of Judaic studies. Each fellow is given an office at the Herbert D. Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies in downtown Philadelphia, and receives research support from the Katz Center's staff and librarians. During the course of the year the fellows work on their individual projects and meet at weekly seminars to discuss their on-going research in the company of their colleagues. Intellectual camaraderie--sharing and mutual learning alongside scholars with diverse but focused interests--is the essence of the Katz Center's program. The fellows have ample opportunity to get involved with the academic life on Penn's campus, and to interact with students. At the close of the year, the results of the year's research are presented at the two-day Gruss Colloquium in Judaic Studies, at which the fellows and other invited scholars present the findings, collective and individual, of the year's research and open new avenues of inquiry. Selected work from the year is collected into a volume that is published as part of the series Jewish Culture and Contexts, by the University of Pennsylvania Press.

For any given theme year, the Katz Center invites applications from post-doctoral scholars in the humanities, social sciences, and the arts at all levels. All scholars whose work fits squarely into the proposed research topic are eligible to apply. Fellowships granted may be for one semester or the full academic year. Scholars are required to spend the term of the fellowship in residence in Philadelphia at the Katz Center. The fellowship is open to all scholars, national and international, who meet application terms. International scholars are appointed under a J-1 visa only (Research Scholar status). No exceptions can be made, and the Katz Center reserves the right to cancel awards if the recipient is unable to meet this condition. Applicants should consult the international programs office at their current university to confirm eligibility before applying for this fellowship.

In 2018–2019, the Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania devotes its fellowship to the study of Jews in modern Islamic contexts. 

The fellowship will support scholarship on Jewish life, culture and thought as these have developed in modern times across North Africa, the Levant, the Arabian Peninsula, and Central and South Asia. We will question the meaning of modernity beyond the more familiar European, American, and Israeli contexts and welcome research projects that address topics from the sixteenth century and later.  

The goals for the year are to bridge linguistic, geographic, social, and methodological boundaries, to connect the study of the intellectual with the study of the everyday, and to encourage attention to new sources and approaches. We seek applications from a range of disciplinary orientations: history, textual study, anthropology, art history, media studies, and other fields that expand or redefine the parameters of the topic.

Eligible projects may focus on the complex relationships between Jews and their Muslims neighbors, or with members of various other non-Muslim or minority communities in the Islamic world. Also relevant is research that explores Jews’ participation in various forms of local, regional, national, colonial, and imperial forms of governance in modern North Africa, the Middle East and Central Asia, as well as projects focused on gender relations, economic behavior, cultural expression, and religious life as these developed across diverse Islamic contexts.

About the Fellowship Theme

Jewish Life in Modern Islamic Contexts

In 2018–2019, the Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania devotes its fellowship to the study of Jews in modern Islamic contexts.

The fellowship will support scholarship on Jewish life, culture and thought as these have developed in modern times across North Africa, the Levant, the Arabian Peninsula, and Central and South Asia. We will question the meaning of modernity beyond the more familiar European, American, and Israeli contexts and welcome research projects that address topics from the sixteenth century and later.

The goals for the year are to bridge linguistic, geographic, social, and methodological boundaries, to connect the study of the intellectual with the study of the everyday, and to encourage attention to new sources and approaches. We seek applications from a range of disciplinary orientations: history, textual study, anthropology, art history, media studies, and other fields that expand or redefine the parameters of the topic.

Eligible projects may focus on the complex relationships between Jews and their Muslims neighbors, or with members of various other non-Muslim or minority communities in the Islamic world. Also relevant is research that explores Jews’ participation in various forms of local, regional, national, colonial, and imperial forms of governance in modern North Africa, the Middle East and Central Asia, as well as projects focused on gender relations, economic behavior, cultural expression, and religious life as these developed across diverse Islamic contexts.

Terms

Stipend amounts are based on academic standing and financial need, ranging between $45,000 and $60,000 for the academic year.

The Center provides single-coverage health insurance (fellows are responsible for coverage for any dependents). A modest one-time travel reimbursement is also provided.

We require fellows to be present at the Center a minimum of four days per week (Monday through Friday) during the term of fellowship with the exception of university and Jewish holidays, and to participate fully in Center activities, which consist of a weekly seminar, occasional special events, and a year-end colloquium. Fellows are also encouraged to initiate their own ideas for how to promote intellectual and social interaction. The center offers numerous possibilities for public programming and sharing research with the wider community. These are completely optional and not obligatory, though many fellows find it very useful to share their work in this way.

The Center does not provide housing and it is not included in the fellowship stipend. Should you receive a fellowship, we are available to assist you in your housing search, though you are ultimately responsible for securing your own accommodations.

A New Opportunity for 2018–2019

With funding from the Israel Institute and in partnership with Penn’s Jewish Studies program, the Katz Center is offering a teaching fellowship for the academic year 2018-19. The recipient of the Israel Institute/Katz Center fellowship will be a full participant in the Center’s fellowship program, and will also be expected to offer one undergraduate course per semester on an Israel related subject. The teaching fellowship may be granted for one of both semesters. Stipend amounts are based on academic standing and reflect additional compensation for the teaching responsibilities.

To be eligible for the Israel Institute/Katz Center fellowship applicants must be Israeli citizens with a Ph.D. in a field or subject related to modern Israel and/or who is currently employed at an Israeli institution of higher learning or a research center.

Application date
31 Oct 2017
Duration
1 academic year
Country
America United States Mid-Atlantic
Discipline
Humanities Anthropology, Ethnology and Folklore Architecture Art & Art History Classical Studies Digital Humanities History Literature Media Studies Music & Musicology Philosophy Religion & Theology Social sciences Communication Sciences Demography Economics Environmental Sciences Gender Studies Geography Political science Social Anthropology Sociology
Required post-doc experience: 
between 0 and 99 years
Grants available
Ca. 20
Award granted
US$ 45-60.000 + health insurance + travel reimbursement
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