Stanton Nuclear Security Fellowship

The Belfer Center's International Security Program (ISP) has been invited to participate in a new nuclear security fellowship program funded by the Stanton Foundation. These fellowships are for predoctoral and postdoctoral scholars and junior faculty. The purpose of the fellowships is to stimulate the development of the next generation of thought leaders in nuclear security by supporting research that will advance policy-relevant understanding of the issues. Stanton Nuclear Security Fellows will be joint International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom (MTA) research fellows. All ISP/MTA applicants with a nuclear focus will be considered for the Stanton Nuclear Security Fellowship.

Fellows are expected to produce a written product at the end of the fellowship (e.g. an article, report, or book). Suitable topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Nuclear terrorism
  • Nuclear proliferation
  • Nuclear weapons
  • Nuclear force posture
  • Nuclear energy as it relates to nuclear security

Stipend Information

The Stanton Nuclear Security fellowships offer ten-month stipends of 62,000 USD to postdoctoral research fellows and stipends for junior faculty fellows will be awarded on a case-by-case basis and be commensurate with experience. The fellowships include a full benefits package and a generous allowance for research and professional travel. Office space, computers with LAN and Internet connections, and access to most Harvard University libraries and most of the other facilities will be provided.

The Stanton Foundation

Frank Stanton, the president of CBS News from 1946-1971, established The Stanton Foundation. During his 25 years at the network's helm, Stanton turned an also-ran radio network into a broadcasting powerhouse. Stanton died in 2006, aged 98 years.

According to information provided by the foundation, Stanton was a strong defender of free speech and was determined to use television as an "instrument of civic education." For example, in 1960, he supported the first televised presidential debates with Richard Nixon and John Kennedy, which required a special act of Congress before they could proceed. These debates were credited with helping Kennedy win the presidency, and have since become a staple of U.S. presidential campaigns.

Throughout his life, Stanton was interested in international security and U.S. foreign policy. He served on several presidential commissions charged with preparing the United States for the challenges of living in a nuclear world. In 1954, Dwight Eisenhower appointed Stanton to a committee convened to develop the first comprehensive plan for the nation's survival of the following a nuclear attack. Stanton was responsible for developing plans for national and international communication in the aftermath of a nuclear incident. According to a statement from the foundation, "The Stanton Foundation aims, through its support of the Nuclear Security Fellows program, to perpetuate his efforts to meet [such] challenges."

Terms of Fellowship

The Center's programs and projects offer a variety of both pre-doctoral and post-doctoral research fellowships. Fellows are appointed for ten-month appointments from September through June, with a possibility for renewal.

Fellows are expected to devote some portion of their time to collaborative endeavors, as arranged by the appropriate program or project director. Pre-doctoral research fellows are expected to contribute to the Center's research activities, as well as work on — and ideally complete — their doctoral dissertations. Post-doctoral fellows are also expected to complete a book, monograph, or other significant publication during their period of residence. All fellows are expected to be in the Cambridge area for the duration of their fellowship.

Eligibility

Pre-doctoral candidates must have passed their general examinations and have made significant progress on their dissertations in order to be considered. Applications for fellowships are welcome from recent recipients of the Ph.D. or equivalent degree, university faculty members, and employees of government, military, international, humanitarian, and private research institutions who have acquired appropriate professional experience. The Belfer Center seeks applications from political scientists, lawyers, economists, those in the natural sciences, and others of diverse disciplinary backgrounds. The Center also encourages applications from women, minorities, and citizens of all countries.

Application date
1 Feb 2017
Duration
10 months
Country
America United States New England
Discipline
Social sciences Economics Environmental Sciences Geography International Relations Law Political science
Required post-doc experience: 
between 0 and 99 years
Award granted
US$ 62.000
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