Princeton Network Operations and Internet Security (NOISE) Lab

Princeton University

The Network Operations and Internet Security Lab (Professor Feamster’s research group at Department of Computer Science at Princeton University) focuses on developing new algorithms, protocols, and systems for the current and next-generation Internet, with a specific focus on network operations and security. Possible research projects include:

Global measurement of Internet censorship We are building algorithms and tools to continuously monitor Internet censorship on a global scale. We are developing a range of tools to accomplish this task, including Encore, which uses cross-origin requests to measure Web filtering from countries around the world—as well as other tools to collect widespread measurements of global censorship. We are also designing mechanisms to makes these measurement tools safer for users to run in countries where collecting such data might endanger the user who is collecting it.

Design, implementation, and deployment of circumvention tools We are developing tools to help citizens communicate with one another using circumvention tools that are “deniable” (i.e., it is not apparent that they are even being used at all). We have designed various tools to circumvent censorship that are “deniable”, meaning that it is difficult for a censor to prove that a user is using the circumvention tool in the first place. We have designed such tools for Web browsing in the wide-area (e.g., Collage, Infranet), as well as for near-field communications in mobile and wireless networks (e.g., Denali). A possible project would be to explore deniable circumvention in other settings, or to explore steps for making any of these existing systems operational.

Information manipulation Organizations (and software) can manipulate the content that users see. In the best-case scenario, tools such as online personalization algorithms control the results that we see when we perform a simple search on search engines, commerce sites, media sites, and social networks. In the worst case scenario, attackers can actively manipulate what we see by “polluting” user profiles.

We are investigating the scope and extent of information manipulation on the Internet, through techniques such as astroturfing, whitewashing, and personalization. We are collaborating with social scientists to understand how users view information manipulation, and how political organizations use manipulation to affect thought and control citizens.

We have developed some preliminary tools for characterizing inconsistency in Web search results, and we are interested in studying information manipulation more generally, for a broader class of services, applications, and websites.

We are generally interested in empirical network measurement projects, as well as systems-building efforts that have policy connections. We work closely with the Measurement Lab in New York City and are open to arrangements where a fellow would split time between CITP at Princeton and New York City.

In addition, we are generally interested in empirical network measurement projects, as well as systems-building efforts that have policy connections. We work closely with the Measurement Lab in New York City, as well as several other policy organizations (e.g., CITP at Princeton University) and are open to arrangements where a fellow would spent time working with our collaborators in these places.

Mobility
  • Go international
Country
America United States Mid-Atlantic
Institution type
Foreign Institutions Universities and university institutes